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Advisories

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Backcountry camping

There is one designated backcountry campground in this park, with four individual tent platform sites. A shared cooking shelter and picnic table are close by. Random beach camping is allowed along the western beaches of the park. Visitors are discouraged from camping at the beach areas east of the designated camping area. This park is accessible year-round. Please practice “Leave No Trace” camping ethics.

Winter camping

There is one designated wilderness campground in this park, with four individual tent platform sites. A shared cooking shelter and picnic table are close by. Random beach camping is allowed along the western beaches of the park. Visitors are discouraged from camping at the beach areas east of the designated camping area. This park is accessible year-round. Please practice “Leave No Trace” camping ethics.

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Campfires

While small fires are allowed, we encourage visitors to conserve the environment by minimizing the use of fire and using stoves instead. If you do have a fire, please utilize previously constructed fire rings and use small pieces of wood that will burn completely. 

If you can’t find a previously used site, try to construct your fire rings below the high tide mark. There is a fire ring located in front of the picnic shelter at the primary camping area facing Kyuquot Sound. Never leave your fire unattended and practice “Leave No Trace” camping ethics.

Picnic areas

This park has a day-use and picnic area with a pit toilet, fire ring and open-walled picnic shelter near the beach at the primary camping area facing Kyuquot Sound. A bear-proof food cache is located behind the picnic shelter.

Pit or flush toilets

This park has one pit toilet, located at the primary camping area facing Kyuquot Sound.

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Hiking

There is a short, maintained, five minute trail connecting the primary camping area to the west-facing beaches. For your own safety and the preservation of the park, obey posted signs and keep to designated trails. Shortcutting trails destroys plant life and soil structure.

Swimming

There is no designated swimming area at this park. There are no lifeguards on duty at provincial parks.

Canoeing

Rugged Point is popular with ocean kayakers and canoers. Typically, kayakers utilize the west-facing beaches because they are able to pull their kayaks right up on the sandy shore. The beach that faces Kyuquot Sound is more popular with the sail and motorboat crowd because of the semi-sheltered anchorage.

Kayaking

Rugged Point is popular with ocean kayakers and canoers. Typically, kayakers utilize the west-facing beaches because they are able to pull their kayaks right up on the sandy shore. The beach that faces Kyuquot Sound is more popular with the sail and motorboat crowd because of the semi-sheltered anchorage.

Fishing

The waters around Rugged Point are popular with recreational anglers for salmon fishing. Sport fishers camping at Rugged Point must ensure their catch is stored in their boats at anchor overnight to avoid attracting black bears to the camping area. All anglers should check the current regulations issued by Fisheries and Oceans Canada prior to fishing. Anyone fishing or angling in British Columbia must have an appropriate licence.

Pets on leash

Pets and domestic animals must be on a leash and under control all times. You are responsible for their behaviour and must dispose of their excrement. Backcountry areas are not suitable for dogs or other pets due to wildlife issues and the potential for problems with bears. Backcountry areas are not suitable for dogs or other pets due to wildlife issues and the potential for problems with bears.

Windsurfing

The outer west-facing beaches of Rugged Point Marine Park have become quite popular for surfing. Visitors planning on surfing can make arrangements for water taxi services from Kyuquot or Zeballos.