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Kitasoo Spirit Bear Conservancy

Advisories

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Marine-accessible camping

Wilderness camping is allowed; no facilities are provided.

Campsites in this area are few and small and by midsummer water supply is limited at most campsites. For campers arriving by kayak, camping opportunities may be limited by sea fog, strong currents, surf landings and high tides.

Wilderness camping

Wilderness camping is allowed, but no facilities are provided.

Campsites in this area are few and small and by midsummer water supply is limited at most campsites. For campers arriving by kayak, camping opportunities may be limited by sea fog, strong currents, surf landings, and high tides.

Campfires
Please Conserve Firewood. Campfires are allowed but firewood is not provided. Be prepared to bring a portable stove for cooking. If you must have a fire, please burn only dead and down wood, and be sure to extinguish the fire fully. Dead wood is an important habitat element for many plants and animals and it adds organic matter to the soil so please use it conservatively, if at all. You can conserve firewood and air quality by keeping your campfire small.
Hiking

For your own safety and the preservation of the conservancy, obey posted signs and keep to designated trails. Shortcutting trails destroys plant life and soil structure.

There are hiking trails on Swindle Island.

Swimming
There are no lifeguards on duty at provincial parks, protected areas or conservancies. Swimming is not recommended here, because the water is cold and can be rough.
Canoeing
Numerous sea kayaking opportunities are available for exploring the many inlets, coves, islands and sandy beaches. Experienced paddlers can plot an 80km course from Swindle Island to Bella Bella following the exposed west coast of Price Island. Another option for self-sufficient paddlers is to make the 12km paddle north to Princess Royal Island from Swindle Island.
Kayaking
Fishing

The area is popular for river and ocean fishing. Five species of salmon and steelhead are abundant in the summer while Coho and steelhead are present in the winter. Anyone fishing or angling in British Columbia must have an appropriate licence.

Hunting

The conservancy is open to hunting. Please refer to the BC Hunting & Trapping Regulations Synopsis for more information.