In This Park

Activities Available at this Park
Facilities Available at this Park

Park Contact

Manning Park Visitor Centre: Provides a bathroom, picnic rest area, sani-station, maps, retail, as well as camping, interpretive and general information. Located 1km east of Manning Park Lodge.

Open: 9:00am – 6:00 pm daily, mid-June through mid-September
Phone: 604 668-5953

For information on Manning Park Resort, please visit their website: manningpark.com

E.C. Manning Park’s frontcountry campgrounds and day-use areas, as well as Buckhorn wilderness site and the Park’s Visitors Centre park proudly operated by:
Sunshine Valley Recreation Inc.
Phone: 604 668-5953
Fax: 250 840-8848
camping@manningpark.com

E.C. Manning Park’s wilderness campgrounds and backcountry trail system are proudly maintained by BC Parks.
BC Parks – Manning Park Field Office
Phone: 250 840-8708
parkinfo@gov.bc.ca
bcparks.ca/info/feedback/

Fire Restrictions in Effect for this Park
Smoking is prohibited
During a campfire ban, smoking is restricted in all public areas of a park or protected area. Please read this Information Bulletin.

E.C. Manning Provincial Park

About This Park

E.C. Manning Provincial Park

E.C. Manning Park is a focus of outdoor recreation that is unique in British Columbia. Located in the heart of the Cascade Mountains it is within a three hour drive from either the Lower Mainland or the Okanagan. The climate and geography have combined to make this park an all season recreation area. Bisected by Hwy. 3, E.C. Manning Park is one of the most popular provincial parks in the province. The diversity of the park's landscape, combined with four seasons’ development and easy access are the prime factors which stimulate visitor interest. The park contains a large number of scenic, historic, floral and fauna attractions and provides a wide range of both summer and winter recreation. For further reading, please see this report: Manning – A Complete Natural and Cultural History [PDF 6.51MB]

Four summer drive-in campgrounds along the Highway 3 Corridor offer vehicle accessible camping, day-use interpretive trails while backcountry/wilderness opportunities offer longer hiking trails, horse use and backcountry camping.

The park has a large variety of walking/hiking trails which range anywhere from a 15 minute walk to a 6 day hike. In many cases the views and floral displays are one of a kind. The diversity within this park is what makes it so spectacular and there is sure to be something to meet everyone’s needs.

Know Before You Go

The Weather Network

Stay Safe

  • The park has a large variety of walking/hiking trails that range anywhere from a 15-minute walk up to a 6-day hike. For your own safety and the preservation of the park, obey posted signs and keep to designated trails. Shortcutting trails destroys plant life and soil structure.

Special Notes

  • The plants in this park are susceptible to winds, rain, extended periods of dry weather, heavy snow fall and a very short growing season. For this reason we ask that you and your pets stay on the trails, don’t trample or pick the flora.
  • E.C. Manning Provincial Park does not have cell service; the nearest public phones are at Manning Park Resort located on Highway #3.
  • ATVs and other off-road vehicles are not permitted within the park. This includes vehicles registered under the ORV Act.

Reservations

All campsite and group site reservations must be made through the BC Parks reservation system. When reservations are not available all campsites function as first-come, first-served. Reservations can now be booked up to four months in advance of the date you wish to camp or two days prior to arrival.

Campsite Reservations

Campsite reservations are accepted at Lightning Lake, Coldspring, Mule Deer and Hampton campgrounds; Lightning Lake campground is 100% reservable,Coldspring and Mule Deer are approximately 50% reservable and 50% first-come, first-served sites. Hampton campground is 80% reservable and 20% first-come, first-served.

Reservations for Skyview RV Campground can be made through the Manning Park Resort Skyview booking system.

Group Camping Reservations

There are three group campsites available at this park. Check the Dates of Operation for reservable dates. Group campsite reservations are accepted at this park through the BC Parks reservation system.

Location

Bisected by Hwy 3, the park stretches for 58 km from portal to portal. The western portal, marked by the carving of a marmot, is 26 km east of Hope and the eastern portal, marked by a carving of a bear, is 52 km west of Princeton. The core area of the park is located 68 km east of Hope and 68 km west of Princeton.

Maps and Brochures

Clark Geomatics
Click the map above to visit Clark Geomatic’s website to purchase your own E.C. Manning/Skagit Valley topographic map! (1:50,000)
Any maps listed are for information only; they may not represent legal boundaries
and should not be used for navigation.

Nature and Culture

History

Established in 1941 the park was named in memory of Ernest C. Manning, Chief Forester of British Columbia from 1936 - 1941. Mr. Manning was killed in an airplane accident in 1941. During his time as Chief Forester he was very instrumental in developing the idea of setting land aside for future generations to enjoy.

Prior to the park, as we know it today, being established the Three Brothers Preserve was established in 1931 to save the alpine meadows from overgrazing by sheep. This was a 6,440 hectare area which is part of what we now know as Sub-Alpine Meadow. The preserve was doubled in size in 1936 and the Three Brothers Wildlife Reserve was formed. Since 1941 when the Class “A” Provincial Park was established there have been several revisions to the boundaries. The most recent was in October 1999 increasing the size to 70,844 hectares.

In 1949 the Hope Princeton Hwy was completed that made the park accessible to motor vehicles and in 1957 Manning Park boasted construction of the first nature house in the province.

The park is home to a great deal of history both natural and human. For those interested, a very informative “Natural and Human History Interpretive Theme Document for Manning Provincial Park” was written in 1989 and published by Arenaria Research and Interpretation. The document was not published for resale but might be available at local libraries. A reference copy is available at the Visitor Centre.

Ernest C. Manning 1890-1941:
“One of  British Columbia’s great public servants died Thursday in the Northern Ontario plane crash. There was no man to whom the people of this province owed a greater debt for self-sacrificing service than to Ernest C. Manning. His job was chief forester for this adopted province. It was indeed his mission in life. He was our ablest exponent of outdoors beauty and outdoors wealth...”
The safe establishment and perpetuation of our timber resources was the chief end and ambition of his career. No civil servant in this part of the world ever gave himself more completely to his job, or more intelligently.

Cultural Heritage

Historic trails in the park include the Dewdney Trail, Hope Pass, Whatcom Trail, Engineers Road, Skyline Trail and the provincially significant Blackeye’s Trail. Historic features include the remains of ranches, trapping cabins, mining shafts, Buckhorn mining camp and historic fire lookout buildings at Windy Joe and Monument 83.

Conservation

E. C. Manning Provincial Park, together with the Skagit Valley Provincial Park to the east and the Cascade Recreation Area to the north, for a significant continuous Protected Area unit in the southern interior of British Columbia. Bordered to the south by the North Cascades National Park in Washington, U.S.A., Manning is at the centre of a major tract of protected lands that are of international significance.

In addition to its widely popular recreational values, Manning features particular ecological values, due in part to its location at the transition between the wet coastal ranges and the dry interior plateau.

The geography and ecology of E.C. Manning Provincial Park is as varied as it is dramatic. Ranging from the wet coastal mountains, to jagged snow-capped peaks, alpine meadows filled with wildflowers in the early summer, to the chain of small lakes or broad, flowing river beds along the valley floors.

E. C. Manning Provincial Park is characterized by a wide diversity of plants, animals, soils and landforms. Many rare and endangered species depend upon the large areas of protected habitat within the park. E. C. Manning’s role continues to be that of one of British Columbia’s major recreation and tourism destinations, but equally importantly, an important protected area for the conservation of British Columbia’s unique natural heritage.

Wildlife

E. C. Manning Provincial Park is home to a wide variety of birds and animals. There are 206 separate species of birds and 63 species of mammals within the park. Many of these are quite common species, such as the Columbian ground squirrel and the common pika, but also found in Manning are the less common mountain beaver, wolverine and the Cascade golden-mantled ground squirrel. E. C. Manning Provincial Park and the Cascade Recreation Area are also central to efforts to recover the threatened grizzly bear population of the North Cascades, forming part of the core habitat area for the conservation of this small but significant population.

The spotted owl is at risk in British Columbia, because much of its preferred habitat has been adversely affected by logging or lost due to land development. These rare birds are known to occur within E. C. Manning Park and a management plan to conserve spotted owl in the Manning and Skagit Valley areas is underway.

Activities Available at this Park

Canoeing

Canoeing

There are canoeing and kayaking opportunities on Lightning Lake. Canoe, kayak and paddle board rentals are seasonally available at Lightning Lake day-use area. Contact the park operator for more information.

Cycling

Cycling

Mountain bikes are permitted on roadways and the following trails: Monument 83, Windy Joe, Poland Lake, East Similkameen [PDF], West Similkameen [PDF]; Lone Duck, North Gibson and South Gibson [PDF]. Cyclists must yield to hikers and horses. Bicycle helmets are mandatory in British Columbia.

Fishing

Fishing

Lightning Lakes chain offers easily accessible fishing opportunities for rainbow trout. For the hardy hiker, Poland Lake and Nicomen Lake also offer good fishing for rainbow trout. Motorized boats, including boats with electric motors, are not permitted on any lakes within the park. Anyone fishing or angling in British Columbia must have an appropriate licence.

Hiking

Hiking

E.C. Manning Park is in the Cascade Mountains and the hiking season is dependent on snow levels. Most high elevation trails are not snow free until late June or early July. During the winter season hiking trails are under snow.

Below is a list of trails in the park. Trail conditions can change quickly due to weather conditions.

Easy Trails
  • Beaver Pond: 500 m loop / 15 minutes return / no elevation change. Begins on Highway 3, 1.5 km east of Manning Park Lodge. An easy, level walk with excellent bird-watching opportunities in May and June.
  • Little Muddy: 2.5 km one-way / 1 hour one way / 100 m elevation change. Begins below the tennis courts at Manning Park Resort and follows a double track route (groomed x/c trail in winter) to Lightning Lake day use area.
  • Paintbrush: 1.5 km loop / 30 minutes return / little elevation change. Hikers can start from either the Upper or Lower parking lots at the end of the Blackwall Road. Best time for wildflowers is from mid July to mid August.
  • Rein Orchid: 500 m loop / 15 minutes return / little elevation change. Begins 1.1 km along the Gibson Pass Road. The white rein orchid is best seen in July.
  • Rhododendron Flats: 500 m loop / 15 minutes return / little elevation change. Located 32 km west of the Manning Park Resort, this trail travels through an impressive stand of red rhododendrons with peak bloom early June.
  • West Similkameen: 2.1 km one way / 45 minutes one way / little elevation change. Located 1 km up Gibson Pass Road, this relatively easy route is also the start of the Pacific Crest Trail and ends at the Windy Joe Junction.
  • Strawberry Flats: 2 km one way / 45 minutes one way / little elevation change. Beginning at Strawberry Flats parking, this stroll along an old fire road connects to the bottom of the ski hill and the Three Falls trail.
  • Sumallo Grove: 500 m loop / 15 minutes return / wheelchair accessible. Sumallo Grove is located on highway 3 about 10 km east of the west entrance of the park.
  • Viewpoint Loop: 600 m loop / 20 minutes return / 100 m elevation change: This trail forms the start of the Heather Trail and begins at the end of the Blackwall Road. Loops back after the first viewpoint.
Moderate Trails
  • Canyon Nature Trail: 2 km one way / 45 minutes one way / 50 m elevation change. Begins 1 km up Gibson Pass Road just over the Similkameen River on the right. Follows a canyon along the Similkameen river and returns on the other side.
  • Dry Ridge: 300 meters one way / 20 minutes one way / 125 m elevation change. Begins 500 m up the gravel road leading from the Cascade Lookout.
  • East Simikameen Trail: (From Windy Joe Trail to Castle Creek) 4.7 km 2 hrs return. Trail commences near the Similkameen River on the Windy Joe trail and rolls along as far as Castle Creek - Bridge over Castle Creek is presently CLOSED; as a result this trail is an out and back.
  • Engineers Loop: 500 m loop / 15 minutes return / 200 m elevation change. Begins at the Westgate parking area.
  • North and South Gibson: 7.2 km loop / 2.5 hours return / 125 m elevation change. Starts at Strawberry Flats parking and follows winter cross-country routes.
  • Heather: 21 km one way to Nicomen Lake / 7-9 hours one way / 292 m elevation change. Start at the Upper Alpine parking lot on the Blackwall Road. Trail explores the famous meadows of the Three Brothers Ridge.
  • Lightning Lake Loop: 9 km loop / 3 hours return / little elevation change. Begins at Lightning Lake day use area or at the Spruce Bay parking lot. Follows a route around the entire lake with the option of shortening to a smaller loop at Rainbow Bridge.
  • Lightning Lakes Chain – to Thunder Lake: 12 km one way from Lightning Lake day use area, 10 km from Spruce Bay parking / 4 hours one way / Little elevation change with either route. Travels along the shore of all four lakes of the chain.
  • East Similkameen: 4.7 km one way / 2 hours one way / little elevation change. Trail is from the Windy Joe trail to Castle Creek. Bridge over Castle Creek is presently CLOSED; as a result this trail is an out and back.
  • Three Falls: 4.5 km one way (2 km follows the Strawberry Flats trail) / 3 hours / little elevation change. Beginning at Strawberry Flats parking, this route follows an old fire road to the base of the ski area at 1.8 km where the Three Falls trailhead is located.
  • Monument 78: 12 km one way / 4-5 hours one way / 200 m elevation change. Starts at Monument 78/83 parking lot.
Difficult Trails
  • Bonnevier: 17 km one way to Heather trail junction / 8-10 hours / 950 m elevation change. Begin at Eastgate entrance sign. Strenuous uphill hike connecting to the Heather trail.
  • Dewdney: 25 km one way to Paddy’s Pond and the park boundary / 14-16 hours / 1131 m elevation change. Begins at the Cascade parking lot and ends at the Whipsaw FSR.
  • Frosty Mountain: 10.4 km one way from Lightning Lakes or 14.2 km one way from Windy Joe parking / 4-6 hours one way / 1150 m elevation change. Begin at Lightning Lake day use or Windy Joe/PCT parking. Distances are to the summit.
  • Grainger Creek: 9.2 km one way / 4 hours one way / 952 m elevation change. Starts from a junction 7.1 km up the Hope Pass trail and goes to Nicomen Lake.
  • Hope Pass: 24 km one way / 10 hours one way / 1000 m elevation change. Beginning at Cayuse Flats this historic trail was the old commerce route from Hope to Princeton.
  • Hozameen Ridge: 3.9 km one way / 2 hours one way / 450 m elevation change. Heads south from the Skyline II trail just west of Mowich camp and picks its way along a sub-alpine ridge toward Mt. Hozameen.
  • Memaloose: 9 km one way / 4 hours one way / 450 m elevation change. Begins at the Allison Pass Highways Yard and climbs to Poland Lake.
  • Monument 83: 16 km one way / 5 hours one way / 850 m elevation change. Begin at Monument 78/83 parking lot.
  • Mount Outram: 8.2 km one way / 6 hours one way / 1673 m elevation change. Begins at Westgate parking. Most of this route is outside of Manning Park and not maintained by BC Parks.
  • Nicomen Lake Trail: 7.5 km one way / 2.5 hours one way / 300 m elevation change. The trail is from Nicomen lake to the Hope Pass trail. Rated as difficult due to its remoteness, though most of this route is physically moderate.
  • Pacific Crest Trail: 12.2 km one way / 4-5 hours / 450m elevation change. Begins at Windy Joe - PCT parking on the Gibson Pass Road and ends at US border.
  • Poland Lake: 8 km one way / 3-4 hours one way / 435 m elevation change. Begin at Strawberry Flats parking lot.
  • Skagit Bluffs: 5.7 km one-way / 2.5 hours one way / 225 m. elevation change. Connects Cascade parking with Cayuse Flats via a route that was once part of the old Dewdney Trail.
  • Skagit River: 14.3 km one-way / 4-6 hours one way / little elevation change. Begins at Sumallo Grove Parking and connects to 26 Mile bridge parking on the Silver-Skagit Road. Most of this trail is in Skagit Valley Provincial Park.
  • Skyline I: 14.6 km one way / 6 hours one way / 775m elevation change. Begins at Spruce Bay parking or Strawberry Flats parking. Can be made a 20.5 km loop combined with the South Gibson and Lightning Lakes trails.
  • Skyline II: 18.6 km one way / 7-9 hours one way / 500 m elevation gain, 1350 m elevation loss. Connects the Skyline I trail to the Silver-Skagit Road. Mowich Camp is 12.5 km from Strawberry Flats parking.
  • Warburton Loop: 7 km one way / 3 hours one way / little elevation change. To and from the Dewdney trail. Rated as difficult due to its remoteness and the difficulty of trail finding in sections.
  • Whatcom: 9.5 km one way / 5 hours one way / elevation change: 1082 m. Starts 2.4 km up the Dewdney trail. A common loop is made with the Dewdney trail for a total distance of 22.5 km.
  • Windy Joe Mountain: 8 km one way / 4.5 hours one way / elevation change: 525 m. Begin at Windy Joe - Pacific Crest parking lot on the Gibson Pass Road. Climbs to an old fire lookout.
Horseback Riding

Horseback Riding

E.C. Manning Park Hiking Trail Guide [PDF]

Horses are allowed on designated trails only, these include:

Skagit Bluffs trail is closed to horses.

Camp only in designated areas. Horse Camping is available at the Headwaters Corral located at Manning Park Resort, also back country horse camps are available on the Dewdney and Hope Pass trails. Carry backpacking stoves and avoid having campfires. Unless otherwise noted on the trail description all horse camps include a toilet, fire ring, water, hitching rail and grazing.

E.C. Manning Park Hiking Trail Guide [PDF]

Hunting

Hunting

Hunting is only permitted in the MU 2-17 portion of the Park; the former Cascade Recreation Area. These areas are only open to the discharge of firearms, bows and crossbows from September 10 to June 15 during lawful game hunting season. Please check the BC Hunting & Trapping Regulations Synopsis for more information.

Interpretive Programs

Interpretive Programs

Programs run from late June through early September at Lightning Lake Amphitheatre. Interpretive nature walks are also available at the Alpine Meadows, Rein Orchid trail, and other locations. There are also periodic special events including the Lightning Lake Lantern Festival, special guest speakers, and programs in conjunction with Jerry’s Rangers. Visit Manning Park Resort at manningpark.ca, email camping@manningpark.com, or call the Visitor’s Centre (summer, only) at 604 668-5953 for program themes and locations. Programs run rain or shine; dress appropriately.

Interpretive Walks

Join the park naturalist on an interpretive tour of one of Manning’s many trails. Themes will vary, so be sure to dress appropriately! Suitable for all ages, everyone is welcome.

Jerry’s Rangers

A summer program for kids and families. Get an official Jerry’s Rangers Certificate and earn stickers, pins or badges after completing these programs.

Evening Programs

The Naturalist presents and evening of fun and education at the Lightning Lake Amphitheatre. Appropriate for all ages, everyone is welcome. Parking is available at the Spruce Bay Beach parking lot.

Guest Speaker Series

Manning Park will be hosting some passionate, incredible Guest Speakers this summer!

Pets on Leash

Pets on Leash

Pets/domestic animals must be on a leash at all times and are not allowed in beach areas or in park buildings unless designated. You are responsible for your pets behaviour and must dispose of their excrement.

There is an area set aside at the Lightning Lake day-use area for pets at the east end of the lake, which includes a picnic area and beach. There is also a designated pet area on the east side of the restaurant at Manning Park Resort.

Swimming

Swimming

Lighting Lake is a great spot for a dip, but often remains cool well into the summer. There are no lifeguards on duty at provincial parks.

Wildlife Viewing

Wildlife Viewing

There are excellent opportunities to view a variety of wildlife in E.C. Manning Park. The animal life includes squirrels, chipmunks, marmots, pika, coyotes, beaver, muskrat, deer, bear, moose and most members of the cat family. More than 200 bird species have been spotted here.

Some good locations include: Beaver Pond, Rein Orchid, Lightning Lake day-use area, and the Similkameen Trail, often in the early morning.

Winter Recreation

Winter Recreation

There are backcountry trails for ski-touring and snowshoeing, as well as groomed cross-country ski trails.

Facilities Available at this Park

Accessibility

Accessibility

Sumallo Grove trail, Lightning Lake day-use area and the washhouses in the Lightning Lake campground are wheelchair-accessible.

Boat Launch

Boat Launch

A hand-launch is available next to the boat rental building at the Lightning Lake day-use area. No motorized boats are permitted on the parks lakes, including those with electric motors.
Cabins / Huts

Cabins / Huts

For information on private cabin rentals in E.C. Manning Park contact Manning Park Lodge at info@manningpark.com or call toll free 1 800 330-3321. There are no public cabin rentals in this park.

Some backcountry campsites, including Frosty Creek, Nicomen Lake and Poland Lake, have shelters for emergency use and should not be considered for use instead of a tent. Buckhorn Camp has a large, non-reservable public shelter for cooking.

Campfires

Campfires

Open fires are not permitted in Buckhorn and Kicking Horse wilderness sites. In the rest of the backcountry, open fires are not encouraged. Bring a portable stove for cooking.

Firewood for use in frontcountry drive-in campgrounds can be purchased in the park or you may bring your own.

To preserve vegetation and ground cover, don’t gather firewood from the area around your campsite or from elsewhere in the park. Dead wood is an important habitat element for many plants and animals and it adds organic matter to the soil. You can conserve firewood and air quality by keeping your campfire small. Limited burning hours or campfire bans may be implemented. Be prepared and bring a portable stove for cooking.

Drinking Water

Drinking Water

All backcountry sites have a water source close by, although during a long, hot summer some creeks may dry up; carry water with you. Treatment of water is recommended. Water taps or hand pumps are located throughout the frontcountry drive-in campgrounds and day-use area.

Electrical Hookups

Electrical Hookups

Electrical hookups are available at Skyview RV Campground.
Group Camping

Group Camping

There are group campsites at this park. Reservation information »

Group Summer Camping

Lone Duck I and Lone Duck II are available for summer camping. The group campsites are open from May to October. (Dates subject to change due to weather conditions) The group sites consist of a shelter complete with picnic tables and wood stove; toilets, an open area for tents, a parking lot and the use of showers at the Lightning Lake campground. Both sites overlook Lightning Lake's Lone Duck Bay. They are located 4 km off of Highway 3 on Gibson Pass Road. There are several hiking/walking trails close to this campground and the Lightning Lake Amphitheater is a very short walk.

Group Winter Camping

Cambie Creek Group Campsite is available for large group reservations and consists a pit toilet, parking lot and a large walk-in camping area to set up tents. No fires are permitted. There is no running water or picnic tables at this site.

Lone Duck II Group Campsite is also available for smaller groups to book and has a cooking shelter with a wood stove and tables, toilets, a fire pit and a number of locations to set up tents.

Group Camping Fees

Youth group camping charges per night are $1/person (6+), with a $50 minimum and $150 maximum. Read the Youth Group policy about Criteria for Youth Groups.

Regular group camping charges per night are the base rate for the site, which is $20.00/group site/night, plus $5/adult (16+, minimum charge for 15 adults), plus $1/child (6-15). Children under 6 are free!

Picnic Areas

Picnic Areas

This park has day-use/picnic areas at 8 locations: West Gate Portal, Sumallo Grove, Coldspring campsite, Lightning Lake day-use area, Spruce Bay, Sub-Alpine Meadows, Blowdown and the Visitor Centre.
Pit or Flush Toilets

Pit or Flush Toilets

The backcountry sites have pit toilets only, frontcountry campgrounds have both pit and flush toilets (refer to individual campground information for detail).
Playground

Playground

A playground is located beside Site #15 and the Spruce Bay Beach access trail in Lighting Lake campground.
Sani-Station/Dump

Sani-Station/Dump

A sani-station is available during the summer season, located 1 km east of Manning Park Lodge at the Visitor's Centre. Opening and closing dates are subject to change due to weather.
Sani-station Use Fee: $5.00 per discharge
Showers

Showers

Showers are available for campers staying at the Lightning Lake Campground, Lone Duck Group Sites, Skyview Campground and Hampton Campground.

Vehicle Accessible Camping

Vehicle Accessible Camping

This park offers vehicle accessible campsites. There are four summer drive-in campgrounds with a total of 355 sites. There are also two areas set aside for winter camping. Lightning Lake campground is 100% reservable. (Campsite reservations), Coldspring and Mule Deer are approximately 50% reservable and 50% first-come, first-served sites. Hampton campground is 80% reservable and 20% first-come, first-served.

  • There is a maximum of two vehicles per campsite and an additional charge per night for the second vehicle.
  • Once in the park, payment by cash, debit or credit card at the Visitors Centre or Manning Park Lodge.
  • Generator hours are: 9:00 am – 11:00 am and 6:00 pm – 8:00 pm.
  • Quiet hours are 10:00 pm to 7:00 am: Music, generators, etc. must be shut off completely between these hours. Due to the close proximately of campsites in the park, ensure music and loud voices are kept within your campsite at all times to provide visitors with the opportunity to experience the sounds of nature, and to protect and enhance the soundscape of the park.
  • Dogs must be on a leash at all times and are not allowed in beach area. There is a dog area located to the east of Lightning Lakes day-use area.
  • All campground opening dates are weather dependant. Snowpack levels may persist into June. Early season reservations may be affected due to operational requirements or limitations. Contact the park operator to check current campground conditions.

Coldspring and Hampton campgrounds
Vehicle Accessible Camping Fee: $23.00 per party/night
BC Senior’s Rate (day after Labour Day to June 14 only): $11.50 per senior party/night.
Read the User Fees Policy for information on Senior Camping Discounts.
Mule Deer Campground
Vehicle Accessible Camping Fee: $25.00 per party/night
BC Senior’s Rate (day after Labour Day to June 14 only): $12.50 per senior party/night.
Read the User Fees Policy for information on Senior Camping Discounts.
Lightning Lake Campground
Vehicle Accessible Camping Fee: $35.00 per party/night
BC Senior’s Rate (day after Labour Day to June 14 only): $17.50 per senior party/night.
Read the User Fees Policy for information on Senior Camping Discounts.
Walk-In/Wilderness Camping

Walk-In/Wilderness Camping

Backcountry Camping Fee: $5.00 per person / night for visitors 6 years of age or older.

Backcountry camping with limited facilities are provided at 10 backcountry campgrounds, with a total of 55 sites.

Backcountry camping during summer/snow free season is permitted only at designated backcountry campgrounds.  Winter backcountry camping is permitted at either designated backcountry campgrounds or elsewhere in the Park provided no-trace ethics are practiced (designated backcountry campgrounds have a water source close by, although they may run near into the fall. Treatment of water is recommended.  All designated backcountry campsites have at least one pit toilet.  A backcountry permit is required year-round.

A “Pack it in, Pack it out” policy is in effect. Please practice “No Trace Camping [PDF 1.2MB].” Open fires are not permitted in Buckhorn and Kicking Horse backcountry sites. In the rest of the backcountry open fires are not encouraged and fire bans may be implemented during extreme hot weather conditions. Be prepared to bring portable stoves for cooking.

Many of these camps are located at a high elevation and therefore are not usually accessible until late June or early July.

Payment can be made online prior to your arrival, through BC Parks’ Backcountry Registration System, or, at the Manning Park Visitor Centre, the Manning Park Lodge or the Lightning Lake gate house; payments are cash, debit or credit card only. An ATM is located at Manning Park Resort on Highway #3. All revenue received assists with the maintenance costs in E.C. Manning Provincial Park.

Get a Backcountry Permit

Winter Camping

Winter Camping

The following areas are set aside for winter camping:

Lone Duck 1

Walk–in winter tenting/camping parties can camp at the Lone Duck 1 winter camping area which is located 4 km off Highway 3 on the Gibson Pass ski hill road. This campsite consists of a shelter (currently closed due to COVID-19) with picnic tables, counter top, wood stove; a fire pit, pit toilets, parking area and a large walk-in camping area to set up your tent. You can bring your own firewood or purchase it from Manning Park Resort located just off of Highway #3.

Lone Duck II group campsite

This walk-in site is available by reservation only and consists of a shelter complete with picnic tables, wood stove; a fire pit, pit toilets, parking lot and a large walk-in camping area to set up your tents or dig-in.  You can bring your own firewood or purchase it from Manning Park Resort located just off of Highway #3.

Lightning Lake Day-use area (self-contained units)

Self-contained units can camp in the Lightning Lake day-use area parking lot located 3.7 km off of Highway 3 on the Gibson Pass Ski Hill Road. The pit toilets are open, no fires are permitted, and no potable water or picnic tables are available. Tenting is prohibited in this location.

Winter Camping Fee: $13.00 per party/night
Cambie Creek (Group Campground)

Located approximately 5 km west of Manning Park Resort, this area is available for reservations and consists a pit toilet, parking lot and a large walk-in camping area to set up your tent. No fires are permitted.

E.C. Manning Park Backcountry

Winter camping is permitted in the backcountry at either developed backcountry sites or elsewhere in Manning Park provided no-trace ethics are practiced. Backcountry is defined as areas of the Park at least 1km from maintained roadways, parking lots or developed winter facilities. A backcountry permit is required year-round.