Bicycling in British Columbia

Riding on Southern Vancouver Island – Photo courtesy of  Destination BC/Reuben Krabbe

British Columbia is home to a diverse range of mountain biking, road biking and bicycle touring opportunities from coastal, dry interior, to the brisk, high alpine environments. Mountain bikers of all skill levels can enjoy trails that gently meander through grasslands, twist and flow through lush rainforests, or have steep drops and rocky slopes.

BC Parks offers many great camping locations, oftentimes in or near the most popular bike trail networks in the province. Many of these campsites include shower facilities and tent camping to better support bicycle touring. In select campgrounds, pump tracks offer kids the opportunity to hone their skills. When you are planning your biking itinerary, remember to include BC Parks as your ‘go to’ camping destination.

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Vancouver Island

Become one with nature on Vancouver Island. Explore the diverse ecosystem that defines Vancouver Island from the rugged coastlines, sandy beaches, and towering snow-capped mountains to deep, ancient caves, peaceful old-growth forests and meadows bursting with brilliant wildflowers.
Victoria/Cowichan Valley

The Capital Regional District boasts the most cyclists per capita in Canada at 6.6% of the population! Victoria and its surrounding communities provided numerous kilometres of country roads, paved bike paths and single-track trails for the cycling enthusiast. The scenic Cowichan Valley offers country roads, pleasant scenery and pedal driven winery tours.

For visitors looking to ride mountain bikes in the Victoria area, the campground at Goldstream Provincial Park is within a 10 km radius of six multi-use trail networks:

  • Harbourview near Sooke
  • Francis King Park
  • Thetis Lake Regional Park
  • Mount Work Regional Park
  • Partridge Hills
  • Hartland Mountain Bike Park
All combined, these networks provide over 175 trails to choose from.

Learn more about these trails.

Goldstream Provincial Park

Located a mere 16 km from downtown Victoria, Goldstream Provincial Park campground offers excellent amenities for bicycle touring including shower facilities and tenting sites. The campground also provides a pump track and skills loop trails for keeping kids on bikes busy and having fun. The pump track is ideal for toddlers on run bikes to children on BMX and mountain bikes. Adjacent to the pump track are 240 metres of skills loop trails for beginner and intermediate skilled riders.

The campground is close to a few great road and gravel riding opportunities such as country roads on the Saanich Peninsula, the Galloping Goose and Lochside rail-trails, and The Great Trail.

Learn more about Goldstream Provincial Park

Gordon Bay Provincial Park

For those riding the popular Victoria - Cowichan Valley - Port Renfrew – Sooke cycle touring loop route, consider a layover at Gordon Bay campground on the shore of beautiful Cowichan Lake. This campground provides shower facilities as well as a nice 20 by 12 metre figure eight pump track for the kids.

Learn more about Gordon Bay Provincial Park

Parksville

The Hammerfest trail network located 17 km from Parksville is one of the more popular mountain biking areas on Vancouver Island containing over 53 single-track trails for your mountain biking enjoyment. The country roads between Parksville, Qualicum, Errington and Coombs also provide some awesome road riding opportunities.

The campground is close to a few great road and gravel riding opportunities such as country roads on the Saanich Peninsula and the Galloping Goose and Lockside rail-trails.

Learn more about these trails

Rathtrevor Beach Provincial Park

Located 17km from the Hammerfest trail network, Rathtrevor Beach Park is Vancouver Island’s most popular campground with all campsites within a five-minute walk to the beach. The park also features a large day use area. The campground provides a pump track and skills trail for the kids and some of the nicest amenities for supporting bicycle touring in the region with its ample shower facilities and 40 tent sites.

Learn more about Rathtrevor Beach Provincial Park

Englishman River Falls Provincial Park

Nestled right next to the Hammerfest trail network, Englishman River Falls has a large day-use area, a campground containing 104 campsites and several hiking trails that meander through the forest and along the river canyon. The park also provides new family friendly biking features including a pump track in the campground and a 2.3 km beginner level multi-use trail that connects to the larger trail network adjacent to the park.

Cycling is permitted on roadways and designated trails in this park. Bicycle helmets are mandatory in BC. Bicycles with electric assist motors (e-bikes) are permitted on signed or designated trails within Englishman River Falls Provincial Park, provided they meet the definitions and criteria for e-bike use as outlined in the guidelines for bicycling in BC Parks.

Learn more about Englishman River Falls Provincial Park

Port Alberni

Port Alberni has three small areas to ride trails within a 5 to 10 km radius of town:

  • Coombs Candy
  • City Trails
  • Sproat Lake
All combined, these three locations offer over 40 trails to choose from.

Learn more about these trails

Sproat Lake Provincial Park

If bicycle touring from Parksville to Ucluelet / Tofino, consider camping at Sproat Lake Provincial Park located 15 km west of Port Alberni. The campground is well appointed with shower facilities and tent sites very close to the lake front.

Learn more about Sproat Lake Provincial Park

Comox Valley

The Comox Valley provides a spectrum of cycling opportunities. Riders at all levels can enjoy roads and trails near the ocean, meadows and forests.

The Cumberland Community Forest, beside the Village of Cumberland, offers over 135 trails within 150 acres of mature forest for mountain bikers to enjoy. Only 2 km away from Cumberland across Comox Lake is the Forbidden Plateau trail network containing another 70 trails to choose from. These two trail networks combined make for the most expansive mountain biking area on Vancouver Island.

Denman and Hornby Islands offer great road riding opportunities. A popular ride is to leave your car at Buckley Bay on Vancouver Island and take the ferry to Denman. Ride across the island to the next ferry to Hornby. Then, ride around the island in a clockwise direction returning via the Ford Cove to Shingle Spit trail.

Moutn Geoffrey Escarpment Provincial Park, on Hornby Island, offers mountain biking trails in the park, adjacent Mount Geoffrey Regional Nature Park and Crown Land. The trails in the park are, by far, the most scenic on Mount Geoffrey and well worth checking out! In all, Hornby Island offers over 60 trails that are mostly beginner to intermediate level difficulty.

Cycling is permitted on roadways and designated trails in Mount Geoffrey Escarpment Provincial Park. Bicycle helmets are mandatory in B.C. Please note that bicycles with electric assist motors (e-bikes) are permitted on signed or designated trails within park, provided they meet the definitions and criteria for e-bike use as outlined in the guidelines for bicycling in BC Parks.

When you are road riding or mountain biking on approved trails, be sure to include BC Parks in your itinerary. BC Parks day-use areas:

Horby Island

Denman Island

Learn more about Comox Valley trails.

Miracle Beach Provincial Park

Camping at Miracle Beach Provincial Park provides an excellent base for enjoying mountain biking on central Vancouver Island. The campground is central to eight multi-use trails:

  • Cumberland Community Forest
  • Mount Washington Resort
  • Oyster River
  • Woods Creek
  • Beaver Lodge Lands (family friendly, beginner level)
  • Snowden Demonstration Forest
  • Radar Hill
All combined, these netowrks offer over 350 trails to choose from.

The campground at Miracle Beach Provincial Park is the largest on Vancouver Island and is well appointed to support bicycle touring layovers.

Learn more about these trails.

Learn more about Miracle Beach Provincial Park

Campbell River

Campbell River is home to the Snowden Demonstration Forest (aka Snowden) where you can choose from just shy of 60 single track trails, ranging from rocky technical to smooth, family friendly cruisers with lovely lakes and forested scenery. In addition, there are seven multi-use trails, known as the “Pumphouse” network - within Elk Falls Provincial Park - that provide a mostly single-track connection from the park’s Quinsam Campground to the Snowden Trail network.

A few kilometres south of Snowden is the Radar Hill trail network offering mostly intermediate to expert level difficulty. Taking a ferry to Quadra Island will provide access to the Morte Lake Recreation Site and Quadra Island North network where you can also choose from just shy of 60 single track trails varying from beginner to advanced. All three of these trail networks including Beaver Lodge Lands are all within easy striking distance from Elk Falls Provincial Park, Quinsam Campground.

Learn more about Elk Falls Provincial Park

Cycling is permitted on roadways and designated trails in Elk Falls Provincial Park. Bicycle helmets are mandatory in B.C. Please note that bicycles with electric assist motors (e-bikes) are permitted on signed or designated trails within park, provided they meet the definitions and criteria for e-bike use as outlined in the guidelines for bicycling in BC Parks.

Learn more about these trails

Sunshine Coast

Riding Sunshine Coast single-track – Photo courtesy of Destination BC/Stirl and Rae Photo

This area boasts beautiful coastline and dense old-growth rainforests that crawl into the mountains. Mountain biking is available all year-round in this enchanting coastal destination. The northern portion of the Sunshine Coast is recognized for technical cross-country trails while the southern portion is known for smooth, natural flowing trails lined with spectacular scenery.

With over 15 trail networks, riders of all skill levels can enjoy the diversity of trails the Sunshine Coast has to offer, from steep downhill tracks and technical cross-country, to family friendly, green trails. In addition, this area provides an assortment of paved roads and forestry roads for the cycle touring, bike packing and gravel bike enthusiasts.

Powell River

There are six multi-use trail networks within a 10 km radius of Powell River:

  • Millennium Park
  • Gallagher Hill
  • Mahoney
  • Duck Lake (includes multi-use trails in Duck Lake Protected Area)
  • Penticton Maze
  • Suncoast
All combined, these three locations offer over 200 trails to choose from.

Learn more about these trails.

Inland Lake Provincial Park

This park is popular amongst campers and day-use visitors for swimming, fishing, canoeing and boating. But it is most recognized for the 13 km long, wheel-chair accessible, family friendly multi-use trail that circles the lake. The grade is mostly flat with some elevated boardwalks and bridges. Please use extreme caution as the trail is shared with hikers and disabled users in wheelchairs. For your own safety and the preservation of the park, obey posted signs and keep to designated trails. Shortcutting trails destroy plant life and soil structure.

For people riding gravel bikes and bike packing, tent camping is provided on Anthony Island, approximately 3 km from the main campground. Camping on Anthony Island is on the bare ground. Please camp in designated sites.

Please note that bicycles with electric assist motors (e-bikes) are permitted on signed or designated trails within Duck Lake and Inland Lake Provincial Parks, provided they meet the definitions and criteria for e-bike use as outlined in the guidelines for bicycling in BC Parks.

Learn more about Inland Lake Provincial Park

Saltery Bay Provincial Park

Mermaid Cove campground in Saltery Bay Provincial Park provides 42 vehicle accessible campsites and is located just over 30 km from all the Powell River area multi-use trails.

Learn more about Saltery Bay Provincial Park

Sechelt

Coast Gravity Park located minutes from downtown Sechelt offers riders of all levels the opportunity to experience trails built and designed by world-renowned builders and riders. Riders have access to a user-friendly shuttle system to access the trails.

In addition to Coast Gravity Park, Sechelt is centrally located to eight multi-use trail networks:

  • Kleindale trails next to Spipiyus Provincial Park
  • Middle Point
  • Trout Lake
  • Connor Park
  • West Sechelt
  • Kinnikinnick Park (mainly easy trail)
  • B&K
  • Sprockids
All combined, the Sechelt area offers over 345 trails to choose from.

Learn more about these trails.

Porpoise Bay Provincial Park

Porpoise Bay Provincial Park is a favorite for families and outdoor enthusiasts. The park is separated from the Strait of Georgia by the isthmus at Sechelt. This park is characterized by second-growth forest, open grassy areas and sandy beaches. The campground at Porpoise Bay Provincial Park provides 84 vehicle accessible campsites and makes an excellent base camp given its proximity to the Coast Gravity Park and the other bike trail networks either side of Sechelt.

In addition, this campground is well suited for supporting cycle touring and bike packing by providing separate tent sites for cyclists close to shower facilities. Another close option for camping is the smaller 21 vehicle accessible campground at Robert’s Creek Provincial Park.

Learn more about Porpoise Bay Provincial Park and Robert's Creek Provincial Park

Sea to Sky Corridor

Riding the accessible trail at Mt Seymour Park – Photo courtesy of BC Parks

There are few tarmacs in the world with as much awe-inspiring scenery as the Sea-to-Sky Highway. Officially known as BC Highway 99, this legendary route from Vancouver to Whistler and beyond is a drive with incredible sights at just about every turn. It's also filled with fun stops, including outdoor destinations, cultural points of interest and historic sites.

The Sea to Sky Corridor boasts world-class pedal-driven adventures, from extensive mountain bike trails to kilometres of paved and gravel roads. This stretch also contains some breathtaking provincial parks including Nairn Falls, Garibaldi, Brandywine Falls, Alice Lake, Stawamus Chief, Shannon Falls, Murrin, Porteau Cove, Cypress and Mount Seymour.

Pemberton/Whistler

Within a 10 km radius from the Village of Pemberton there are five multi-use trail networks:

  • One Mile Lake
  • Upper Pemberton
  • Mosqito Lake
  • Mackenzie
  • South Rutherford
All combined, the Pemberton area offers over 135 trails to choose from.

Learn more about these trails.

The Village of Whistler is home to one of the most expansive mountain biking areas in the province. There are 10 different, interconnected, multi-use trail networks:

  • Whistler North
  • No Flow Zone
  • Westside – Rainbow
  • Lost Lake
  • Whistler Village
  • Blackcomb
  • Westside – Sproatt
  • Whistler South
  • Cheakamus
  • Whistler Bike Park
All combined, the Whistler area offers over 425 trails to choose from.

Learn more about these trails.

Nairn Falls Provincial Park

Located only 30 km north of Whistler, and just five minutes from Pemberton town center, is Nairn Falls Provincial Park. This park provides a good base camp for exploring the Pemberton Valley and Whistler while experiencing the plethora of mountain biking this area has to offer. The campground provides 94 vehicle accessible campsites.

The trail to Nairn Falls is closed to cyclists. Please note that cycling and bicycles with electric assist motors (e-bikes) are permitted on signed or designated trails within Nairn Falls Provincial Park, provided they meet the definitions and criteria for e-bike use as outlined in the guidelines for bicycling in BC Parks.

Learn more about Nairn Falls Provincial Park

Squamish

The Town of Squamish is central to seven multi-use trail networks:

  • Brohm Lake
  • Cat Lake
  • Alice Lake & Highlands
  • Brackendale family friendly, beginner trails
  • Diamond Head
  • Lava Flow
  • Valleycliffe
All combined, the Squamish area offers over 200 trails to choose from.

Learn more about these trails.

Alice Lake Provincial Park

For visitors looking to ride mountain bikes on the variety of trails that Squamish has to offer, camping at the Alice Lake Provincial Park is a great choice. The campground provides 96 vehicle accessible campsites and along with its 12 walk-in / bike-in tent sites and shower facilities is very suitable for supporting the cycle touring and bike packing recreationalist.

Cycling and bicycles with electric assist motors (e-bikes) are permitted on signed or designated trails within Alice Lake Provincial Park, provided they meet the definitions and criteria for e-bike use as outlined in the guidelines for bicycling in BC Parks

The park also contains several multi-use trails and contributes to the Alice Lake & Highlands trail network. For those who like to ride road and gravel bikes, the campground at Alice Lake Provincial Park provides a relatively quick ride to many of the nearby natural attractions including: Brackendale Eagles, Garibaldi, Stawamus Chief, Shannon Falls and Murrin Provincial Parks as well as the Sea to Sky Gondola.

Learn more about these parks:

North Shore

At the southern end of the Sea to Sky Corridor, from Horseshoe Bay to Deep Cove lies a group of four multi-use trail networks known as the “Shore” – a network with deep roots that was influential in the B.C. mountain biking culture:

All combined, the North Shore offers over 230 trails to choose from.

Learn more about these trails.

Mount Seymour Provincial Park

This park contains a few multi-use trails which contribute to the Mount Seymour mountain bike network. BC Parks is currently working collaboratively with the North Shore Mountain Bike Association and the District of North Vancouver to better plan, maintain and regulate trail use activities within Mount Seymour Provincial Park. Included in this collaborative effort is the development of an adaptive mountain bike trail loop which includes a portion in the park.

Cycling and bicycles with electric assist motors (e-bikes) are permitted on signed or designated trails within Mount Seymour Provincial Park, provided they meet the definitions and criteria for e-bike use as outlined in the guidelines for bicycling in BC Parks.

Learn more about Mount Seymour Provincial Park

Fraser Valley

Golden Ears Provincial Park – Photo courtesy of BC Parks/Iain Robert Reid

The Fraser Valley known for its wide river valley, patchworks of fields, farm culture and mountainous terrain on either side offers great places for visitors on bicycles to discover. Both sides of the valley provide places to ride ranging from single-track trails, to foothill gravel roads, to valley bottom country roads.

Maple Ridge/Mission

The countryside between Maple Ridge and Mission provide bicycling opportunities ranging from pedal driven winery tours to epic gravel road loops. Mountain biking opportunities within easy striking distance from Golden Ears Provincial Park include:

  • Golden Ears Provincial Park
  • Silver Valley
  • Thornhill
  • Woodlot
  • Stave West – Rolley Lake
  • Red Mountain
  • Bear Mountain
  • Heritage Mountain
All combined, the Pemberton area offers over 130 trails to choose from.

Learn more about these trails

Golden Ears Provincial Park

Don’t forget to bring your bikes when camping at Golden Ears Provincial Park and take advantage of the bike friendly amenities and cool places to ride nearby. The park provides three large campgrounds that include 423 vehicle accessible campsites, two group campsites, 20 walk-in / bike-in campsites and shower facilities. For an easy, family friendly bike packing opportunity the campground is only a short 11 km ride from downtown Maple Ridge.

Cycling and bicycles with electric assist motors (e-bikes) are permitted on signed or designated trails within Rolley Lake Provincial Park, provided they meet the definitions and criteria for e-bike use as outlined in the guidelines for bicycling in BC Parks.

Learn more about Golden Ears Provincial Park

Rolley Lake Provincial Park

Mountain bikers camping at Rolley Lake Provincial Park will appreciate the easy riding distance to the Woodlot trail network. Cyclists will also be pleased that the campground provides shower facilities making this park a good choice for the gravel grind / bike packing enthusiast. The campground at Rolley Lake Provincial Park provides 64 vehicle accessible campsites.

Learn more about Rolley Lake Provincial Park

Abbotsford/Chilliwack

This side of the Fraser Valley offers six multi-use trail networks for your riding enjoyment:

  • Downes Bowl/McLure Hillside
  • Ledgeview
  • Sumas Mountain
  • Vedder Mountain
  • Tamihi (Chilliwack River)
  • Chilliwack Community Forest
All combined, these networks offer 250 trails to choose from.

In addition to these trail networks, the area provides good gravel and bike packing opportunities on local forest service roads, the Vedder North and South Dyke trails and the Trans Canada trail out to Chilliwack Lake.

Learn more about these trails

Cultus Lake Provincial Park

Camping at Cultus Lake Provincial Park makes for a great base of operations for enjoying all the trail riding this area has to offer. The campground provides 301 vehicle accessible campsites, four group campsites and shower facilities. The park also provides 25 cabins appealing to the cycle touring and bike packing crowd. All in all, it’s worth bringing your bikes to Cultus Lake Provincial Park!

Bicycles are permitted on some of the Cultus Lake trails. Most specifically the Horse Trail Loop above the southeast side of Cultus Lake. Many of the other trails are foot traffic only. Bicycle helmets are mandatory in British Columbia. Please note that bicycles with electric assist motors (e-bikes) are permitted on signed or designated trails within Cultus Lake Provincial Park, provided they meet the definitions and criteria for e-bike use as outlined in the guidelines for bicycling in BC Parks.

Learn more about Cultus Lake Provincial Park

Coquihalla Canyon Provincial Park

In the early 1900s, the Canadian Pacific Railway decided a route was necessary to link the Kootenay Region with the B.C. coast by rail. The railway was built over three mountain ranges. In the Coquihalla Gorge – the river cut a 100-metere deep channel of solid granite. A straight line of tunnels was built through it which are known now as the Othello Tunnels.

There are spectacular viewing opportunities available on the rail-trail, through the tunnels and on the bridges. This park highlights the Kettle Valley Railway grade that passes through the canyon and five tunnels which were built in 1914. This rail-trail can be explored on either mountain or gravel bikes.

Bicycle helmets are mandatory in British Columbia. Cyclists please dismount and walk through tunnels. Flashlights are strongly recommended for anyone cycling through the tunnels. Please note that bicycles with electric assist motors (e-bikes) are permitted on signed or designated trails within Coquihalla Canyon Provincial Park, provided they meet the definitions and criteria for e-bike use as outlined in the guidelines for bicycling in BC Parks.

Learn more about Coquihalla Canyon Provincial Park

Crowsnest Highway

Riding the Kootenay Rockies – Photo courtesy of Destination BC/Dave Heath

British Columbia Highway 3 – better known as the Crowsnest Highway, skirts the southern portion of the province eastward from Hope B.C. toward Alberta. This stretch of highway is almost entirely in mountainous terrain and goes through communities rich in mining and railway history. It also provides access to a range of mountain bike, gravel bike and road biking adventures on numerous multi-use trail networks, rail grades and forestry roads. The Hope - Princeton portion of the Crowsnest traverses the Cascade Mountain Range and is loaded with breathtaking natural scenery including the majestic E.C. Manning Provincial Park.

E.C. Manning Provincial Park

E.C. Manning Provincial Park is a focus of outdoor recreation that is unique in British Columbia. Located in the heart of the Cascade Mountains it is within a three-hour drive from either the Lower Mainland or the Okanagan. The climate and geography have combined to make this park an all-season recreation destination. The park provides a range of layover options including camping and roofed accommodations as well as amenities including a restaurant, gas station and general store.

The park contains four vehicle accessible campgrounds and three group campsites. Visitors planning on riding bicycles while at E.C. Manning Provincial Park will appreciate the new family friendly pump track and skill trails at Hampton Campground. The cyclo-touring crowd will value the shower facilities and roofed accommodation options available at Manning.

There are a handful of multi-use trails in the park that allow bikes providing opportunities that are more of a “double-track”, gravel grind, backcountry riding experience. Please note that bicycles with electric assist motors (e-bikes) are permitted on signed or designated trails within E.C. Manning Provincial Park, provided they meet the definitions and criteria for e-bike use as outlined in the guidelines for bicycling in BC Parks.

Learn more about E.C.Manning Provincial Park

Boundary Country

Boundary Country gets its name from being a stretch of southern British Columbia towns between Rock Creek and Trail that closely borders the United States. This area is known for its Rail Trails. The Columbia and Western Railway (C&W) and the Kettle Valley Railway (KVR) once connected our communities to the rest of the country. Take your time to explore the KVR and C&W rail trails. These rail grade trails are ideal for family riders, gravel grind enthusiasts and bike packing adventures.

If riding single-track trails on a mountain bike is more your thing there are 10 locations to chose from surrounding the communities of Grand Forks and Christina Lake including:

  • Midway Trails
  • Jewel Lake
  • Thimble Mountain
  • Fishermans
  • Grand Forks
  • Gilpin Grasslands Provincial Park
  • Steward Creek Trails
  • Lynch Creek
  • Gladstone Provincial Park
  • Santa Rosa Trails
All combined, the Boundary Country area offers 60 trails to choose from.

Learn more about these trails

Kettle River Recreation Area

While exploring Boundary Country, the Kettle River Recreation Area provides camping opportunities with bicycle friendly amenities among an open ponderosa pine forest. The KVR rail trail is closely adjacent to the recreation area providing an ideal layover at the campground for folks doing multi-day bike packing and gravel grind adventures. The campground at Kettle River provides 114 vehicle accessible campsites, two group campsites, shower facilities and a family friendly bicycle pump track for the kids.

The campground at Kettle River Recreation Area is typically at full capacity from July through September so booking well in advance is recommended. For cyclists, temperatures are ideal during the spring and fall making this park an excellent shoulder season choice.

Please note that bicycles must keep to roadways and designated trails. Bicycle helmets are mandatory in British Columbia. Bicycles with electric assist motors (e-bikes) are not allowed on the trails within Kettle River Recreation Area. E-bikes are restricted to park roads, the KVR rail trail and areas where motorized use is permitted. See our guidelines for bicycling in BC Parks for more details.

Learn more about Kettle River Recreation Area

Gilpin Grassland Provincial Park

Gilpin Grassland Provincial Park is a recreation destination for local residents and visitors to the area. The upland portions of the park provide a panorama of exceptional scenic value. The KVR rail trail passes through the lower portion of the park.

Bicycle helmets are mandatory in British Columbia. Please note that bicycles with electric assist motors (e-bikes) are permitted on signed or designated trails within Gilpin Grasslands Provincial Park, provided they meet the definitions and criteria for e-bike use as outlined in the guidelines for bicycling in BC Parks.

Learn more about Gilpin Grassland Provincial Park

Gladstone Provincial Park

Providing 62 vehicle accessible campsites, the Texas Creek campground at Gladstone Provincial Park provides a good base camp for riding the Boundary Country trail networks. Cyclists will appreciate the campground’s shower facilities. The park also has several backcountry / wilderness campsites with the one at Trapper Creek on the east side of Christina Lake accessible via a 10 km trail ride from Texas Creek Campground.

Cycling is allowed on designated trails within the park. Please note that bicycles with electric assist motors (e-bikes) are permitted on signed or designated trails within Gladstone Provincial Park, provided they meet the definitions and criteria for e-bike use as outlined in the guidelines for bicycling in BC Parks. Cyclists should use caution accessing the Texas Creek campground via East Lake road as there is no bike lane on this seasonally busy road.

Learn more about Gladstone Provincial Park

West Kootenay

In keeping with the Nelson and Kootenay Lake culture, the trails in this part of British Columbia really appeal to the spirit of mountain biking. This area features gentle rail grades that start minutes from downtown and take you for many kilometres along forest trails, over restored trestle bridges and into some of the most peaceful country you’ll ever encounter. For those of you who need to feel their heart beating and love the surge of adrenaline, the West Kootenay has that too: steep, rocky technical tracks and enough stunts, ladders and big drops to keep you coming back and calling out for more.

This area has ten multi-use trail networkd to ride:

  • Rover Creek
  • Blewett
  • Smallwood Creek
  • Morning Mountain
  • Giveout and Gold Creek
  • Mountain Station
  • Svoboda (includes portions of West Arm Provincial Park)
  • Shannon Pass
  • Nelson's North Shore
  • Proctor
All combined, the West Kootenays offer 140 trails to choose from.

Learn more about these trails

Kokanee Creek Provincial Park

Central to all the sweet riding, especially Nelson’s North Shore trail network, is Kokanee Creek Provincial Park. In terms of a base, campers here can enjoy over a kilometre of sandy beaches and four campgrounds – this park has been the number one choice for campers coming to the West Kootenays.

Kokanee Creek Provincial Park provides 189 vehicle assessible campsites within four campgrounds including 13 campsites with electrical hook ups as well as smaller, bike friendly campsites with tent platforms in the new Osprey Point section. In addition, there is a group campsite, a playground, two day-use picnic areas and a boat launch. Mountain bikers and cyclo-tourists will appreciate the park’s shower facilities.

Learn more about Kokanee Creek Provincial Park

West Arm Provincial Park

West Arm Provincial Park extends along the shore of Kootenay Lake from Nelson to Harrop and up to the peaks behind. The creek fans and pocket beaches are popular with boaters. The park is largely undeveloped; there are no facilities or designated campsites.

The park contains several mountain bike trails, in varying condition, that are maintained by the Nelson Cycling Club. Bicycle helmets are mandatory in British Columbia. Please note that bicycles with electric assist motors (e-bikes) are permitted on signed or designated trails within West Arm Provincial Park, provided they meet the definitions and criteria for e-bike use as outlined in the guidelines for bicycling in BC Parks.

Learn more about West Arm Provincial Park

Kootenay Rockies

There are so many gems in the Kootenay Rockies when it comes to mountain biking. From seemingly endless alpine trails to 1500-metre descents, this is an emerging area for mountain biking and visitors are lining up to enjoy its unique history and single-track trail adventures.

Set amidst the dramatic Rocky and Purcell Mountains in the southern part of the Kootenays, Kimberley is a biker’s paradise. There are numerous single-track riding options in and around the town of Cranbrook.

This area includes half a dozen trail networks to chose from:

  • Bootlet Mountain
  • Kimberley Nature Park and Kimberley Area Trails
  • Lois Creek
  • Cranbrook Community Forest
  • South Hill
  • South Star Trails
All combined, the Kimberley/Cranbrook area offers over 225 trails to choose from.

Learn more about these trails

Wasa Lake Provincial Park

Camping at Wasa Lake Provincial Park provides a central location for accessing the Kimberley / Cranbrook trail networks. The Wasa area was logged by the railway in the early 1900s and irrigated for years through a ditch and flume system begun in 1915. Later cattle ranching became the agricultural mainstay. Wasa village provides tourist facilities and services.

Wasa Lake Provincial Park was established in 1955 to provide recreational access to the warmest swimming lake in the Kootenays. The campground offers 94 vehicle assessable campsites, showers, a bike park for the youngsters, a playground, a dog off leash area, four picnic areas and access to swimming, boating, fishing and other water-based activities.

Wasa Lake Provincial Park also includes the 8 kilometre Wasa Lions Way paved path around the lake that accommodates cyclists and pedestrians. A self-guided mountain bike / gravel bike loop takes you from Wasa Lake to Lazy Lake. The Lazy Lake Bike Loop is a 33-kilometre ride which takes you up Wolf Creek Road to Lazy Lake and back to Wasa Lake on Lazy Lake Road. Within this loop is also a small network of green and blue level multi-use trails.

Please note that bicycles with electric assist motors (e-bikes) are permitted on signed or designated trails within Wasa Lake Provincial Park, provided they meet the definitions and criteria for e-bike use as outlined in the guidelines for bicycling in BC Parks.

Learn more about Wasa Lake Provincial Park

Moyie Lake Provincial Park

Another good camping opportunity close to Southstar, South Hill and Cranbrook Community Forest trail networks is Moyie Lake Provincial Park. Located 20 kilometres south of Cranbrook off British Columbia Highway 3/95, Moyie Lake Provincial Park offers a campground with 111 vehicle accessible campsites, day-use area and boat launch while providing the only public access to the deep blue mountain waters of Moyie Lake.

This vacation friendly park features 1,300 metres of developed sandy beach, backed by a large grassy area. Swimming, wind surfing, sailing, boating, wildlife viewing, and a variety of fishing experiences enhance Moyie Lake Provincial Park. The campground also provides a playground and shower facilities.

Learn more about Moyie Lake Provincial Park

Fernie

If you are heading east the last stop for epic single-track trails in British Columbia is Fernie. Mountain biking has become a year-round activity in Fernie with the addition of fat biking during the snowy months. Fernie is also one of the closest major BC mountain biking destinations to Alberta at only a three hour drive from Calgary.

Fernie hosts nine trail networks to enjoy including:

  • Montane Fernie
  • Ridgemont/Fern Ridge
  • Castle Mountain
  • Morrissey Ridge
  • Fernie Alpine Resort
  • Mount Fernie Provincial Park (and surrounding provincial lands)
  • Mount Proctor
  • Mt. Fernie
  • Fernie Ridgemont
All combined, Fernie offers over 225 trails!.

Learn more about these trails

Mount Fernie Provincial Park

There could not be a more central location to camp and access Fernie’s six multi-use trail networks than Mount Fernie Provincial Park. The campground features 67 vehicle accessible campsites, a sani-station and picnicking area. Mountain bikers and cyclo-tourists will appreciate the campground’s shower facilities and walk-in / bike-in campsites.

The park contains several multi-use trails providing family friendly, beginner level trails to enjoy prior to venturing out to the tougher blue square and black diamond level trails outside the park. These trails include the Lazy Lizard Connector which provides access to the must ride – Lazy Lizard - a seven kilometre, seemingly effortless up track that takes riders to a range of blue square and black diamond trail options. For more information on mountain biking in the park and the surrounding area, check the Fernie Mountain Bike Club.

Learn more about Mount Fernie Provincial Park

Okanagan Valley

Cycling the Myra Canyon on the KVR Rail Trail – Photo courtesy of Destination BC/Grant Harder

The diversity of pedal driven adventures in the Okanagan Valley include technical descents, wide open rail trails and gravel grinds, dramatic downhill runs, fast and fun single-track as well as scenic country roads and winery tours. The countryside surrounding the communities of Penticton, Kelowna and Vernon ranges from mountains freshwater lakes, and abundant orchards to world-famous vineyards, rustling grassland and semi-arid landscapes, all connected by Okanagan Lake.

Penticton

Locals have been riding the ridges, benches and rock around Penticton since the 70’s and have developed an endless supply of trails to crank and flow through several trail networks such as Three Blind Mice and Campbell Mountain. In addition to the single-track trail options, the Penticton area provides top notch rail trail and gravel rides including access to the Kettle Valley Rail Trail (KVR) from peaceful Naramata.

There are ten multi-use trail networks in the Penticton area:

  • Cartwright Mountain
  • Conkle Mountain
  • Three Blind Mice
  • Campbell Mountain
  • Esplanade Trail Network
  • Carmi
  • Wiltse
  • Skaha Bluffs (includes portions of Skaha Bluffs Provincial Park
  • Mahoney-White Lake (includes White Lake Grasslands Protected Area
  • Apex and Surroundings (includes Apex Mountain Resort and Bret Mountain Protected Area
All combined, the Penticton area offers over 200 trails.

Learn more about these trails

Okanagan Lake Provincial Park

Camping at Okanagan Lake Provincial Park offers a convenient location for enjoying all the cycling the Penticton area has to offer. The park provides beautiful, sandy/pebbly beaches surrounded by ponderosa pine and sagebrush making this park the perfect spot for swimming and water-based activities to pair with your biking. Okanagan Lake Provincial Park includes two large campgrounds both with panoramic views across the lake to the stunning skyline of Okanagan Mountain Provincial Park.

The campgrounds provide 176 vehicle accessible campsites with 96 campsites at the south campground and another 80 at the north campground. Cyclists will appreciate the shower facilities at both park’s campgrounds.

Learn more about Okanagan Provincial Park

Skaha Bluffs Provincial Park

Skaha Bluffs Provincial Park provides a variety of recreation opportunities including hiking, rock-climbing, wildlife viewing and limited mountain biking opportunities while also protecting habitat for a variety of species at risk. The park’s distinctive terrain features of the bluffs along with the Gillies Creek corridor reflect extremely threatened riparian and grassland plant communities.

Cycling in this park is restricted to designated trails. Please note that bicycles with electric assist motors (e-bikes) are permitted on signed or designated trails within Skaha Bluffs Provincial Park, provided they meet the definitions and criteria for e-bike use as outlined in the guidelines for bicycling in BC Parks.

Learn more about Skaha Bluffs Provincial Park

White Lake Grasslands Provincial Park

The primary role of White Lake Grassland Protected Area is to conserve the very hot and dry grassland, open pine forest and alkali ponds and rock outcroppings of the Southern Okanagan Basin eco-section. The protected area captures the full elevational gradient from lakeshore to mountain top and provides important habitat for many of British Columbia’s red and blue-listed wildlife, plants and plant communities.

Please note that mountain bikes and bicycles with electric assist motors (e-bikes) are permitted on signed or designated trails within White Lake Grasslands Protected Area , provided they meet the definitions and criteria for e-bike use as outlined in the guidelines for bicycling in BC Parks.

Learn more about White Lake Grasslands Provincial Park

Brent Moutain Protected Area

Brent Mountain Protected Area is the only alpine area protected in the Southern Thompson Upland eco-section. The protected area provides an extensive system of wetlands along stream channels as well as krummholz (very old, low-growing shrub varieties of sub-alpine fir and spruce), subalpine parkland, and subalpine and alpine meadows.

Please note that mountain bikes and bicycles with electric assist motors (e-bikes) are permitted on signed or designated trails within White Lake Grasslands Protected Area , provided they meet the definitions and criteria for e-bike use as outlined in the guidelines for bicycling in BC Parks.

Learn more about silver Mountains Provincial Park

Kelowna

The mountain biking terrain near Kelowna serves up a challenge for both experts and novices. The Kelowna area includes urban biking, easy-to-reach single track trails and skills parks. With nearly 300 km of bike lanes, 40 km of separated pathways and access to the Kettle Valley Rail Trail (KVR) this area is one of the most bike friendly in Canada.

There are eight multi-use trail networks in the Kelowna area:

  • Powers Creek
  • Smith Creek
  • Rose Valley
  • Knox Mountain Park
  • Knox Mountain Park East
  • Crawford Trails (includes nearly all of Myra Bellevue Provincial Park)
  • Gillard
  • Okanagan Mountain Provincial Park
All combined, the Kelowna area offers over 300 trails.

Learn more about these trails

Bear Creek Provincial Park

Bear Creek Provincial Park is located within a few kilometres of West Kelowna and is central to all the multi-use trail networks including very close proximity to the Rose Valley trail network. Bear Creek Provincial Park features lakeside camping, sandy beaches and picturesque canyon that tumbles onto a cottonwood-lined delta.

The campground provides 143 vehicle accessible campsites including 21 sites with electrical hook ups, an impressive playground area, sani-station, day-use picnic area and what most cyclists really appreciate – shower facilities.

Learn more about Bear Creek Provincial Park

Myra-Bellevue Provincial Park

Myra-Bellevue Provincial Park is home to some awesome scenery and experiences including the dramatic escarpment of Little White Mountain, the scenic Myra Canyon and the historic Kettle Valley Railway (KVR), with its trestles and tunnels. The portion of the KVR within the park is a destination every cyclist should experience. Bike rentals, concessions and tours are available at the Myra Station parking lot through Myra Canyon Bicycle Rentals, and shuttle services and bicycle/hiking tours are offered with Monashee Adventure Tours. Please note that the Myra Canyon portion of the KVR is very busy during the months of July and August.

For single-track fans, the lower portion of Myra-Bellevue Provincial Park between KLO Creek and Bellevue Creek provides numerous trails of varying difficulty making up most of the Crawford Trails network. The trails within the park are maintained by the Mountain Bikers of the Central Okanagan, a local community organization dedicated to the accessibility of trails and support of mountain biking in the Central Okanagan region of British Columbia. http://mtbco.ca/. Mountain bikers should be aware and respectful of the high volume of other users of the lower Crawford Trails network including hikers, horseback riders, dog walkers and runners.

Please note that bicycles with electric assist motors (e-bikes) are permitted on signed or designated trails within Myra-Bellevue Provincial Park and Protected Area, provided they meet the definitions and criteria for e-bike use as outlined in the guidelines for bicycling in BC Parks.

Learn more about Myra-Bellevue Provincial Park

Vernon

Vernon is emerging as a new mountain biking destination. Located in the north Okanagan, Vernon shares the enviable lifestyle of other Okanagan communities – beaches and peaches - but has the added benefit of having great hillsides and mountains right next to the city. Nearby Silver Star Resort, Kalamalka Lake and Ellison Provincial Parks all have mountain biking trails. The trails in Kalamalka Lake and Ellison Provincial Parks are maintained by the North Okanagan Cycling Society through a partnership agreement with BC Parks.

The great thing about many of these trails is that you can cool off in the lake after a hot summer ride! Silver Star Resort is located just 25 minutes from downtown Vernon and has lift accessed mountain bike trails with over 1600 vertical feet of awesomeness. The trails have been created to meet a full range of riding expectations from beginners to experts. Like the southern portion of the Okanagan Valley, the Vernon area gravel and road riding opportunities including the 17-km Okanagan Rail Trail from Oyama to Coldstream.

There are seven multi-use trail networks in the Vernon area:

  • Ellison Provincial Park
  • Predator Ridge
  • Kalamalka Lake (includes nearly all Kalamalka Lake Provincial Park)
  • King Eddie Plateau;
  • Noble Canyon
  • Silver Star Provincial Park (Sovereign Lake Nordic area)
  • Silver Star Mountain Resort.
All combined, the Vernon area offers nearly 200 trails.

Learn more about these trails

Ellison Provincial Park

Nestled on the northeastern shore of Okanagan Lake, Ellison Provincial Park includes 220 hectares of forested bench lands above a rocky shoreline of scenic headlands and sheltered coves. The park’s natural attractions, combined with the dry, sunny Okanagan climate provide many recreational opportunities from spring through fall. The park provides over 25 single-track trails ranging in difficulty from green circle to black diamond. The trails in the park are maintained by the North Okanagan Cycling Society through a partnership agreement with BC Parks. The trails in Ellison Provincial Park are also adjoining the Predator Ridge trail network.

Not only can you ride the park trails and Predator Ridge trails from your campsites, the park is also an awesome place to camp and be close to the other Vernon trail networks such as Kalamalka Lake and King Eddie Plateau. Ellison Provincial Park offers a campground with 71 vehicle accessible campsites, two day-use picnic areas down at the lakeshore, a playground for the kids and shower facilities.

Please note that bicycles with electric assist motors (e-bikes) are permitted on signed or designated trails within Ellison Provincial Park, provided they meet the definitions and criteria for e-bike use as outlined in the guidelines for bicycling in BC Parks.

Learn more about Ellison Provincial Park

Kekuli Bay Provincial Park

Another camping opportunity that is central to the Vernon trail networks is Kekuli Bay Provincial Park. The park is located off Highway 97, 11 kilometres south of Vernon and situated along the west side of Kalamalka Lake, a popular destination for boating and other water-based activities. For cyclists, the Okanagan Rail Trail bisects the park near the water, providing easy pedaling north and south along Kalamalka Lake.

The campground offers 73 vehicle accessible campsites including four with electrical hook ups. Cyclo-tourists and bike packers will appreciate the additional walk-in / bike-in tent sites and shower facilities. The park also provides a boat launch.

Learn more about Kekuli Bay Provincial Park

Kalamalka Lake Provincial Park

Virtually at the back door of the City of Vernon, Kalamalka Lake Provincial Park is a fine example of North Okanagan grasslands. The park’s landscape is dotted with ponderosa pine, groves of Douglas-fir and the spring wildflower show is truly spectacular. Kalamalka Lake Provincial Park is largely undeveloped and has an all-season appeal to those interested in its natural setting.

The park offers a variety of multi-use trails for your mountain biking pleasure. The Cosens Creek area of the park, south of Cosens Bay Road, is a multi-use trail system maintained by the North Okanagan Cycling Society (NOCS) and boasts some of the best mountain biking in the North Okanagan. Elsewhere in the park, please stay on trails and watch for other users. Mountain bike maps and app access can be found at okcycling.com/trails.

Please note that bicycles with electric assist motors (e-bikes) are permitted on signed or designated trails within Kalamalka Lake Provincial Park, provided they meet the definitions and criteria for e-bike use as outlined in the guidelines for bicycling in BC Parks.

Learn more about Kalamalka Lake Provincial Park

Silver Star Provincial Park

Silver Star Provincial Park is a 5,573 hectare park located 22 kilometres to the northeast of Vernon. This rounded mountain is a typical feature of the Okanagan – Western Shuswap Highland regional landscape. The park is primarily known for its winter recreation but also provides some fine mountain biking opportunities when the snow is not on the ground.

The park contains many multi-use trails maintained by the North Okanagan Cycling Society (NOCS). Trails are often inaccessible until early summer due to snow and may be quite wet for some time after snow-melt. Single track maps and app access can be found at okcycling.com/trails. Lift access mountain biking and additional multi-use trails are located at Silver Star Mountain Resort. Please note that riders transitioning from the provincial park to Silver Star Mountain Resort’s trails require a valid trail pass purchased from the resort.

Bicycles with electric assist motors (e-bikes) are permitted on signed or designated trails within Silver Star Provincial Park, provided they meet the definitions and criteria for e-bike use as outlined in the guidelines for bicycling in BC Parks.

Learn more about Silver Star Provincial Park

South Chilcotin Mountains

Riding up to Taylor Pass in the South Chilcotin Mountains – Photo courtesy of Destination BC/Mason Mashon

When it comes to long, larger-than-life, high alpine riding, there a few places that rival the South Chilcotin Mountains. Within a three-hour drive north from Vancouver this area encompasses high alpine meadows, grasslands, lakes and some of the most gorgeous mountains in B.C. Initially a horseback riding destination, mountain bikers have been enjoying the areas epic single-track trails for years.

When visiting this area there are five locations to enjoy riding multi-use trails including:

  • Bralorne
  • Gun Lake
  • Tyaughton Lake
  • South Chilcotin Mountains Provincial Park
  • Big Creek Provincial Park
All combined, the South Chilcotin Mountains area offers over 75 trails for the seasoned rider. If you are seeking extensive, audacious rides this is your place!

Learn more about these trails

South Chilcotin Mountains Provincial Park

South Chilcotin Mountains Provincial Park is a visually spectacular area with mid elevation grasslands, sub alpine and alpine meadows, alpine lakes and mountain peaks. The park encompasses the complete watersheds of Lizard and Leckie Creeks and significant portions of other large intact watersheds and headwaters.

There are broad valleys and ridges with interconnecting trail systems. Over 200 km of trails through broad valleys, alpine meadows and ridges offering a stellar variety of loop trips of varying difficulty and distances for hikers, horseback riders and of course mountain bikers. Visitors to this park will have an outstanding wilderness experience.

South Chilcotin Mountains Park provides some of the best mountain biking experiences in B.C. with great single-track trails throughout the park. Note that there are steep, muddy and or rocky sections on all trails. Mountain bikers must yield to hikers and horses. When meeting horses, dismount and wait on the downhill side of the trail. When catching up to a string, be patient – the riders will pull aside at the first location that has enough room to let you by.

Please note that bicycles with electric assist motors (e-bikes) are not allowed on the trails within either South Chilcotin Mountain Park and Big Creek Provincial Park. E-bikes are restricted to park roads and areas where motorized use is permitted. See our guidelines for bicycling in BC Parks for more details.

Learn more about South Chilcotin Mountains Provincial Park

Big Creek Provincial Park

The park’s landscapes vary from dramatic mountains and alpine lakes in the south, to gentler volcanic hills and lava formations, to the flat, forested Chilcotin Plateau in the north. Because of the park’s remoteness, visitors must be experienced in backcountry travel and completely self-sufficient. This park teems with wildlife; you might see mountain goats, California bighorn sheep, moose or predators such as wolves, black and grizzly bears. Please do not stress them by approaching closely.

Cycling is permitted in Big Creek Park. Like South Chilcotin Mountain Park, there are steep, muddy and or rocky sections on all trails. Mountain bikers must yield to hikers and horses. When meeting horses, dismount and wait on the downhill side of the trail. When catching up to a string of horses, be patient - the riders will pull aside at the first location that has enough room to let you by. Do not be tempted to venture off the trail, as you can cause long-term damage to this unique ecosystem.

Please note that bicycles with electric assist motors (e-bikes) are not allowed on the trails within either South Chilcotin Mountain Park and Big Creek Provincial Park. E-bikes are restricted to park roads and areas where motorized use is permitted. See our guidelines for bicycling in BC Parks for more details.

Learn more about Big Creek Provincial Park

Columbia Shuswap

Mountain biking near Revelstoke – Photo courtesy of Destination BC/Ryan Creary

Within one of the most scenic parts of British Columbia, along the Trans Canada Highway between Kamloops and Revelstoke lie several top-notch places to enjoy cycling. The Columbia Shuswap Region is home to freshwater lakes, sandy beaches, incredible houseboating, golf, music festivals, farmers' markets, along with spectacular mountains and multi-use trails. Mountain biking in this region is well worth checking out.

Revelstoke

A real up and coming place to ride mountain bikes in the Columbia Shuswap are the multi-use trail networks near Revelstoke also known as “The Stoke”. The Revelstoke mountain biking scene is known for its ease of alpine backcountry access riding opportunities.

Spring and early summer offer lower elevation rainforest trails with tacky dirt, big trees, and an otherworldly sea of green. As the summer heat pushes the snow to the summits, the higher elevation trails will reveal truly spectacular scenery. The riding in this area ranges from shuttle-accessed downhill mountain biking, heli-biking, flow trails and epic cross-country to the family friendly trails at Mount Revelstoke National Park and Greenbelt. The Stoke has it all and more!

The Revelstoke area provides nine multi-use trail networks:

  • Keystone Standard Basin
  • Sale Mountain
  • Frisby
  • Boulder Mountain
  • Mount Revelstoke National Park
  • Greenbelt
  • Mount Macpherson
  • Mount Mackenzie
  • Sunnyside
All combined the Revelstoke area provides over 100 trails for your riding pleasure.

Learn more about these trails

Blanket Creek Provincial Park

Looking for a family camping destination near the Revelstoke mountain biking scene? Then plan a trip to Blanket Creek Provincial Park just south of Revelstoke. This popular park close to the Mount Macpherson trail network was originally a farm now developed to provide recreational opportunities. It is one of a system of four provincial parks on the Arrow Lake Reservoir.

The campground at Blanket Creek Provincial Park offers 105 vehicle accessible campsites, two group campsites, a day use picnic area, playground, swimming lagoon and places to go fishing. They park also provides a sani-station and bike friendly shower facilities.

Please note that bicycles with electric assist motors (e-bikes) are not allowed on the trails within Blanket Creek Provincial Park. E-bikes are restricted to park roads and areas where motorized use is permitted. See our guidelines for bicycling in BC Parks for more details.

Learn more about Blanket Creek Provincial Park

Yellowhead Highway

Cronin Pass, Babine Mountains – Photo courtesy of Destination BC/Robin O’Niell

While mountain biking activity is mostly occurring in southern British Columbia there are a few riding locations further north worth checking out. The Yellowhead Highway which includes BC Highways 5 and 16 traverses the middle of the province west to east from Prince Rupert to Mount Robson Provincial Park and into Alberta at Jasper National Park. Along the way there are some lesser known but evolving places to ride mountain bikes? that folks should experience.

Terrace

When travelling from Prince Rupert east on the Yellowhead Highway your first mountain biking opportunities will be Terrace. Although a small, relatively unknown mountain biking destination, Terrace has developed a reputation for some uniquely fun single-track trails coined by local builders as “tech-flow”. Aside from the spectacular Skeena River scenery and Terrace hospitality, this area offers some fine riding in multi-use trails including:

  • Terrace Mountain
  • Copper Mountain
  • Terrace Rotary Bicycle Skills Park
All combined the Terrace area offers 30 trails ranging from family friendly to fast cross-country to the down-hill/shuttle options at Copper Mountain.

Learn more about these trails

Lakelse Lake Provincial Park

Consider camping at Lakelse Lake Provincial Park while you explore the Terrace single-track for a few days. The park preserves stands of impressive old growth cedar, hemlock and Sitka spruce forests which thrive in the moist air swept in from the Pacific Ocean. Salmon-bearing streams, sandy beaches, water sports and wildlife are some attractions this park offers.

The southern part of Lakelse Lake Provincial Park provides 156 vehicle accessible campsites including 50 with electrical hook-ups at the Furlong Bay Campground. Cyclists will appreciate the three shower facilities the campground offers. Furlong Bay Campground includes a playground, picnic areas, beach, boat launch, visitor center and sani-station. The park also offers a group campsite and additional day-use facilities at Gruchy’s Beach in the northern part of the park.

Learn more about Lakelse Lake Provincial Park

Bulkley Valley

Along Highway 16 between Smithers and Telkwa there are a few multi-use trails to enjoy some mountain biking, ranging from family friendly beginner level to epic black diamond traverses including:

  • Piper Recreation Area
  • The Bluff Recreation Area
  • Ptarmigan Recreation Area
  • Babine Mountains Provincial Park
All combined the Bulkley Valley offers over 40 trails to explore.

Learn more about these trails

Babine Mountains Provincial Park

Babine Mountains Provincial Park within the Skeena Mountains eco-section offers some of the finest outdoor recreation opportunities in west-central British Columbia. Glacier-fed lakes, rugged peaks and extensive sub-alpine meadows provide for day trips and extended adventures. Bicycles are permitted on Harvey Mountain Trail, Silver King Basin Trail, Onion Mountain Road/Trail, Cronin Creek Road/Trail and Higgins Creek Trail. Please see the guidelines for bicycling in BC Parks.

Learn more about Babine Mountains Provincial Park

Tyhee Lake Provincial Park

Consider camping at Tyhee Lake Provincial Park located a stone’s throw from the village of Telkwa. The park is within a half hour drive from Bulkley Valley’s multi-use trail networks. The campground at Tyhee Lake Provincial Park offers 59 vehicle accessible campsites, a group campsite, boat launch, playground, bicycle pump track, day-use picnic areas, paddleboard rentals and a small concession / store. In addition, the park provides bike friendly amenities including some walk-in / bike-in tenting campsites and shower facilities.

Please note that bicycles with electric assist motors (e-bikes) are permitted on signed or designated trails within Babine Mountains and Tyhee Lake Provincial Parks, provided they meet the definitions and criteria for e-bike use as outlined in the guidelines for bicycling in BC Parks.

Learn more about Tyhee Lake Provincial Park

Fort St. James

Fort St. James located north of Vanderhoof is best known for its national historic site but also provides stellar outdoor recreational activities including mountain biking. The town has its own bike park; however, all the multi-use trails are located at Mount Pope Provincial Park. The park offers 25 trails ranging from blue square intermediate to black diamond expert ride experiences.

For folks that would prefer a nice gravel grind ride, consider the historic Nautley/Sowchea Pack Trail which has recently been opened. This 45-kilometre trail was used for generations as an early trade route between villages on Fraser and Stuart Lakes.

Learn more about these trails

Mount Pope Provincial Park

Please note that bicycles with electric assist motors (e-bikes) are permitted on signed or designated trails within Mount Pope Provincial Park, provided they meet the definitions and criteria for e-bike use as outlined in the guidelines for bicycling in BC Parks.

Learn more about Mount Pope Provincial Park

Paarens Beach Provincial Park

Camping at Paarens Beach Provincial Park is a good location for accessing the trails at Mount. Pope. The park provides a campground with 36 vehicle accessible campsites, day-use picnic areas, playground, boat launch and lakefront access to water-based recreation activities in beautiful Stuart Lake.

Please note that bicycles with electric assist motors (e-bikes) are not allowed on the trails within Paarens Beach Provincial Park. E-bikes are restricted to park roads and areas where motorized use is permitted. See our guidelines for bicycling in BC Parks for more details.

Learn more about Paarens Beach Provincial Park

Valemount

Crystal clear blue skies and gorgeous snow-capped peaks will form the backdrop for your epic and unforgettable mountain biking experiences in the Valemount area. In addition to the Valemount Bike Park this area also offers a few other multi-use trail networks worth checking out including:

  • Valemount and Area
  • Valemount Bike Park
  • Mount Robson Provincial Park
All combined the Valemount area offers over 65 trails to enjoy riding.

Learn more about these trails

Mount Robson Provincial Park

Mount Robson Provincial Park, the second oldest park in British Columbia’s park system, is truly one of the world’s crown jewels. The mountain for which the park is named guards the park’s western entrance. At 3,954 metres, Mount Robson, the highest peak in the Canadian Rockies, towers over the lesser surrounding peaks, providing one of the finest views in the Rocky Mountains. Just as the early trappers, hunters and explorers felt in awe at the mountain’s magnificence, travelers today experience the same feelings.

The park offers great camping opportunities including three campgrounds – Robson Meadows, Robson River and Lucerne. Robson Meadows provides 125 vehicle accessible campsites, while Robson River delivers another 41 with 22 providing electrical hook-ups and Lucerne adding another 36 campsites. The Lucerne campground also offers a few bike friendly walk-in tenting sites. Cyclist will appreciate shower facilities at Robson Meadows and Robson River camp. The park also includes two playgrounds, two2 boat launches, a sani-station and day-use picnic areas.

Cycling is permitted on a few trails within the park including the Kinney Lake and Overlander Falls Trail. A bike rack is located at Kinney Lake. There is also a good gravel ride option along the Red Pass Pipeline Access Road offering gentle grades that parallels the highway corridor. Please note that bicycles with electric assist motors (e-bikes) are permitted on signed or designated trails within Mount Robson Provincial Park and Protected Area/Mount Robson Corridor Protected Area, provided they meet the definitions and criteria for e-bike use as outlined in the guidelines for bicycling in BC Parks.

Learn more about Mount Robson Provincial Park